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20130420
20130420
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5
to have a flat tariff of 10% or 20% or 30% whatever it takes to get to a zero trade deficit that doesn't introduce a lot of corruption or a lot of dangers bad policymaking because it's a very simple policy. it's just determined by an arithmetical formula and there's no opportunity for anybody to play games. one of the good things about it if you have a flat tariff, is if you had a 30% tariff on imported goods that's not enough to relocate the production of t-shirts that united states because cost is too great. it's great to relocate things like silicon wafer fabrication so would tend to relocate back to the u.s. high value capital-intensive skill intensive industries which is of course what we want to do. those are the industries that are high-quality -- high-quality into she wants to have and those are the industries that don't want to lose. i point that out just to point out that if you do get serious about protectionism, protectionism has a logic to it which if you understand what that logic is, i think it would be possible for the u.s. to make a winner out of this. whether we shoul
there are people that argue having annual deficit that are almost as big as the federal budget when bill clinton was president is not really a problem. there are people argue having a public held debt be a majority of our economy is not really a problem. there are people who argue that the gross federal debt consuming our entire economy being bigger than our entire economy isn't a problem. and then you have the unfunded liability of the major entitlement program like social security and medicare which are larger by some measures than the world economy. but that's not a problem. and there are usually two arguments that people make to this effect. i try address them in "devouring freedom: can big government ever be stopped?." one is trust us, we're the government. we'll know what to do before the crisis comes. the other it's will a sucker born every minute. people will keep buying the treasury bonds, interest rates will never return to where they were before the financial crisis. the economy at some point will recampaign some semblance of normal growth and everything will be fine. there's no nothi
and to think it gain access. [inaud last year, and i think, and if you look at this, we have, for every deficit, for every level of deficit, it's the -- [inaudible] we have witnessed the difference in the labor costs between different member states. [iudible increase and going down, slowly, but going down, not increasing. greece as risen up in the last quarter, this last year. they made a lot of process in reducing deficit as well. therefore, we are regaining confidence. if you look at markets, markets are very -- gained a lot of confidence, and bonds for all all the members areding italy, below. there used to be -- that's what they say. what we are doing now is the next step of ing abaning union. , we healady a great great -- you need strong european region of banks because our banking's cannot influence one member stating but several. we need the european -- the european -- been commended, implement of supervisory, things into coming weeks, has been already decide thed. we will build -- we have european, i think, relation on insurance. we have european regulation, just not yet decided, and th
the nation, fiscal deficits cut three percentage gdp became more indebted. similarly per world countries, difficult to turn themselves around. fiscal surpluses. the country in particular the one that really, in 2008 to baggage in the coming out of this record new, two dozen seven, experiencing developing commodity prices. the finance minister, to spend and give it back to the people. resisted the pressure. they said to know, this money is for a rainy day. kent, of course, you know the rest of the story, the financial crisis. the deaths of the financial crisis, billions of dollars that allowed it to have a $4 billion tax growth. that is exactly. fiscal policy. hanson grasshoppers. that is discipline. clarity. the clarity, want to tell you the story. not jamaica, but the tiny elephant. in 1992 barbados faced an enormous financial interest, a potential financial crisis. the u.s., heavily dependent. the exports the rest of the world. in barbados dementia national monetary fund. barbados had what's cled a face to exchange is case the billion dollars. the country command the same way the value
, the last child in the woods about children's nature deficit disorder, as he calls it. this has happened slowly. it started with writers like jack london and william long that theodore roosevelt called major fakers. that put -- we go through how we began increasingly to get our views of nature digitally and on screens rather than hands-on a stewardship kind of things. and so we took ourselves out of the storage of business. we took our cells out of the prediction business. huge swaths of the white tailed year's historic range, which is that eastern one-third of the united states, it's off-limits to human predation, and there is all sorts of evidence not to suggest that the biggest predator of white tail deer since the end of the last ice age is not wolves and cougars but human beings. so -- and i had messages is wildlife do a study. two rules which we all think of much. you cannot discharge a firearm within 150 feet of a hard surface road in massachusetts or thin 500 feet of an occupied dwelling. massachusetts has a lot of rose and a lot of people. it is the fourth most dense -- per four
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5